Practicing Statistics in Corporate R&D
William
Brenneman

Procter & Gamble Company

Tuesday, April 14, 2015 - 3:30pm
While many problems faced in industry can be solved with known statistical methods, there are problems encountered that require original research. For a research statistician practicing in industry, these types of problems are a joy to encounter and an opportunity to contribute to the research literature. I will discuss several examples of opportunities identified in my career at Procter & Gamble, some of which led to subsequent statistical research. The problems will be framed in easy to understand language, with just enough technical details to appreciate the work. I will also discuss how both hard and soft skills are needed to be successful in the corporate world.

William Brenneman is a Research Fellow at Procter & Gamble in the Global Statistics and Data Management Department and an Adjunct Professor at Georgia Tech in the Industrial and Systems Engineering Department.  Since joining P&G in 2000, he has worked on a wide range of projects that deal with statistics applications in his areas of expertise: design and analysis of experiments, robust parameter design, reliability engineering, statistical process control, computer experiments, and general statistical thinking.  He was also instrumental in the development of an in-house statistics curriculum.

He received a Ph.D. degree in Statistics from the University of Michigan (2000), an MS in Mathematics from the University of Iowa (1989) and a BA in Mathematics and Secondary Education from Tabor College (1987).  William is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association (ASA), a Fellow of the American Society for Quality (ASQ), and a member of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics and the Institute for Operations Research and Management Sciences.  He has served as ASQ Statistics Division Chair and is currently the Chair-Elect for the Quality and Productivity Section of ASA and an Associate Editor of Technometrics. William also has seven years of experience as an educator at the high school and college level.